Saturday, March 26, 2011

Informal Sociology chez le FN

In an earlier post, I asked for sociological studies of the FN similar to the Skocpol et al. study of the US Tea Party. Rue89's article doesn't quite fill the bill, but it has its entertaining moments. In particular, it emphasizes the "retail politics" of local FN candidates, which pleases young voters turned off by "le type socialiste" who shakes their hands and then forgets about them. The remoteness of the elite is a theme common to all populist movements of both left and right.

1 comment:

FrédéricLN said...

A good paper indeed.

« Démondialisation » is a great new word I didn't know. It should meet success.

The power of "retail politics" is emphasized in the paper; yet the vast majority of FN candidates just do not live in their "canton" (in may of them, voters didn't even had the picture of the person on documents - just Marine Le Pen's face). -> Once being a FN member becomes a little bit more fashionable, once they will have retailers in the towns and "cantons'", imagine the votes potential of the party.

"The remoteness of the elite is a theme common to all populist movements of both left and right."

True in principle, but presently uneffective as far as the extreme left is concerned. It's almost entireley composed of teachers and civil servants (since Arlette Laguiller retired). Their agenda is very, very conservative (in the meaning of: keep things as they are, as far as "public service" is concerned). The only party that targets *mainly* the poor if the FN.