Sunday, March 27, 2011

Le Canard noticed

Le Canard enchaîné has been noticed by The New York Times. It deserves the attention for its particularly important scoops this year, one of which led to the resignation of the foreign minister. Alas, I cannot follow Le Canard directly from here in Cambridge, Mass., because it does not publish on the Web. I do read it whenever I'm in France, however.

5 comments:

Linca said...

Come on, I've just returned from Hanoi for one year, and I was able to get the Canard Enchaîné weekly, there. You need to make arrangments with Air France personel - or get a subscription, I think they accept them from abroad !

Boris said...

What surprises me is that the NYT piece leaves out a crucial piece of information, which must be completely incongruous from a US standpoint : Le Canard is advertisement free. This is why they can keep on being independent and tough, whereas Le Monde for instance is completely alienated by its announcers.
It may be interesting to ponder at this particular moment in time. Yes, they are not on the internet, but is it possible to be on the internet and be truly independant (not talking of blogs of course...) ?
Especially when someone as knowledgeable as the author of this blog seems to take it for granted that if it is not on the web, it is not available.

Arthur Goldhammer said...

I know it's available, but life is short. I spend enough time reading enough things on the Web. But when I'm in Paris, perusing the Canard while downing a demi at my favorite café is a nice thing to do on a warm afternoon. That's all--a lifestyle thing, if you will. I don't feel that there's enough in it that I absolutely must keep up year round. When they publish a scoop, I'll hear about it.

nathanielpowell said...

Well, their website at least has the "une" of every edition online. Quand même 1/8th of the paper! Although surely you can get Harvard to subscribe to it for the library...

As more than one French friend has told me, "Le Monde, c'est la forme, Le Canard, c'est le fond." I think it's at least approximately true, especially since they seem to be the only French paper that does serious investigative journalism these days. Otherwise, it's more or less a print-equivalent of the Daily Show. It's certainly more fun to read than the others.

Anonymous said...

I'd argue that Mediapart does a lot of investigative reporting. In my opinion, they've picked up the mantle from Le Monde. Of course, Mediapart is left-leaning and Le Canard Enchainé is neutral, but both do serious investigative reporting.

I assume that Canard Enchainé is available (subscription) in the US.

I find the comparison with the Daily Show extremely apt! A Daily show with ink, that you open at a café's terrace while drinking something on Wednesday afternoons. :p