Saturday, June 16, 2012

France and Germany

Tensions are mounting between Paris and Berlin as Hollande and Ayrault meet with leaders of the German SPD in Paris. Meanwhile, linguistic boundaries are being crossed everywhere in Europe. The German edition of the Financial Times, concerned about the possible consequences of a Syriza victory in Greece, published an appeal in Greek asking voters in Greece to reject the party of the extreme left. Meanwhile, Jean-Marc Ayrault, an accomplished Germanist, was asked by an interviewer to address Frau Merkel in German, and he obliged, quite credibly to my ear (which is to say, his German accent is a good deal better than mine--not surprising since he taught the subject for many years):


3 comments:

Anonymous said...

I forgot which channel it was last evening, but an interviewee pronounced, as a joke, words which made me shudder - "la grosse Bertha" (a rude way of calling the German leader), "les taxis de la Marne", etc...

Oh well, I thought - my grandfather went, my father went, I believed my generation had escaped, but...

Anonymous said...

Hm, melodramatic much, Anonymous?

They're exchanging words indicating a disagreement. We're far from a war.

This "austerity" v. growth thing needs to be fixed. It's fine to want the moral high ground, but not if it takes everyone down.

Myos

Anonymous said...

Sorry if I was being melodramatic.

Why the hell did this journalist, Elkabbach himself I believe, thought of using these extremely loaded words just because we were having a disagreement about economics?

Mélanie (aka Anonymous because I forgot to sign my previous post)