Thursday, November 29, 2012

Behind the Scenes

Every once in a while, Le Monde publishes an article that pulls back the curtains on public life to reveal some of the private networks that shape the politics we are allowed to see. Ariane Chemin has just written such a piece, revealing what other journalists probably know quite well but we outside observers cannot fathom until some insider is willing to lift the veil, even just a little. Here, we glimpse some of the very interesting relationships that grew out of the Rocardism of the Mitterrand years. "We were the sabras of Rocardism," says one of the group, Stéphane Fouks, who first came to my attention as DSK's publicist after the Sofitel affair. Fouks was part of a trio with Alain Bauer, DSK's security chief, and Manuel Valls, now minister of the interior. The article offers a fascinating glimpse of an evolving nexus of personal and political relationships. With Valls now frequently mentioned as a prime ministerial prospect (despite Mélenchon's audacious self-promotion for the job), this piece is of particular interest for insight into the background of his politics.

4 comments:

George Ross said...

CHOUETTE Il faut le lire et y réfléchir. GR

Louis said...

DSK's security chief? I knew Bauer for the debate on "criminologie" as a section of the CNU (See here: http://insecurite.blog.lemonde.fr/2012/03/11/criminologie-le-monde-universitaire-face-a-la-bande-a-bauer/). I didn't know his links with Strauss-Kahn. Le panier de crabes est plus petit que je ne pensais...

Art Goldhammer said...

No, I got that wrong. Not DSK's security chief. He had gone over to the right by 2007. But he was a security consultant to Sofitel and is said, I think, to have been the person to tip off the Elysée to DSK's arrest.

brent said...

Chapeau, Mélenchon! But more significant than his "audacious" self-nomination as PM is the bold move he makes in re-defining the PG as an "ecosocialist" party--just at the moment when anxieties about climate change as well as the intractable employment situation would seem to call for a radical reorientation. No, Mélenchon will not be forming a government any time soon, but on the other hand, will Valls, like Ayrault, do anything more than kick the can down the road?