Saturday, December 1, 2012

Merkel Hogtied

Although Chancellor Merkel currently reigns as the Iron Lady of Europe, her actions are constrained by German domestic politics. There is an election coming up next year, and there are signs that the "chancellor's majority" is no longer holding:
The focus instead was on the 23 lawmakers from Chancellor Angela Merkel’s own center-right coalition who voted against the measure, robbing her, for the third consecutive vote on Greece, of the so-called chancellor’s majority, or absolute majority among her government’s own deputies.
While not relevant for Friday’s vote, the chancellor’s majority is widely seen as an indicator of the strength of the incumbent’s power base, because most legislation put before the lower house of Parliament requires only a simple majority of those voting. Missing it on three votes in a row on one policy matter, in this case, Greece, is unusual.
“The missed chancellor’s majority is a clear sign that even if one wants to be a good colleague, even her party colleagues do not agree with her government’s policy of pushing these packages through Parliament,” said Manuel Becker, a political scientist at the University of Bonn.

4 comments:

kabir khan said...

hamari website
entertainment
tutorials
urdu tutorials
notes
bollywood actress
bollywood films
software designing
software design
website design
web design
web designing
real estate in dubai
property classified in dubai
Watch GEO SUPER LIVE STREAMING
Watch GEO TV LIVE STREAMING
Watch SONY TV LIVE STREAMING
Watch STAR PLUS LIVE STREAMING
Watch COLORS INDIA TV LIVE STREAMING

Robert said...

What does Becker mean when he says MPs don't agree with Merkel's policy of pushing EU-related packages through parliament? Doesn't EU-related legislation require parliament's approval in any event?

Mitch Guthman said...

@ Robert,

Yes, I didn’t really understand that bit either. The only thing I could think of was either that the majority of her party felt this legislation should be a “free vote” (if such a thing exists in the German parliamentary system) or else that it was getting increasingly difficult to whip the votes for this legislation---the implication being that rising disgruntlement within her party might lead to Merkel going the way of Europe’s other “Iron Lady.”

Louis said...

My 2 cents: domestic politics seem to push Merkel, not towards a policy of releasing the screws of austerity policies, but towards mitigating Germany's commitments to supporting the European system. Part of the opposition to Merkel is based on discontent towards "Germany footing the bill", not on opposition to austerity policy for other European countries.