Sunday, May 18, 2014

The (Not So) New Extreme

Luc Boltanski and Arnaud Esquerre argue that the Front National has become the party of opposition to neoliberalism:

L'ancienne topologie des camps politiques vole en éclats. L'ère de la droite libérale opposée à la gauche sociale-démocrate, tancée d'un côté par le FN et, de l'autre, par l'altermondialisme, a laissé sa place à un autre schéma. Le « drame bourgeois » a fait place à une nouvelle tragédie. Libérale dans les années 1980-1990, l'extrême droite monopolise aujourd'hui l'essentiel de la critique du néolibéralisme. C'est elle qui tient le discours qui rencontre le plus d'échos sur l'exploitation et la domination. C'est elle dont le discours sur la fracture entre le centre et la périphérie, les ilotes et les élites, les « prolos » et les « bobos » gagne le plus d'audience.

5 comments:

Louis said...

Like the communists in the old days...

DavidinParis said...

So many heavy handed words to state that the FN now represents the disenfranchised and as such, are the 'struggling' class. OK, that's cool, or would be were it not for the racist and inflammatory rhetoric that constitutes the historical and still ever present core of their party. No amount of repackaging can alter that nor the brand name of Le Pen.

Anonymous said...

@DavidinParis Someone wise once said "every action begets a reaction". Whatever the "core FN rhetoric" is you refer to, the progress of the FN in France and its equally radical counterparts in several other euro sceptical nation-states seems to suggest one thing: voters are "reacting" to "actions" up with which they will no longer put. In the process they are using whatever democratic vehicles are available to them, however much the "liberals", "progressives" and "leftists" may decry these and slur them.

DavidinParis said...

hmmm....Anonymous, slurring a party that slurs all the rest is an odd accusation indeed. But I agree that historically, parties like the FN never gain traction unless people feel excluded from the national process. That raises another issue of course which has been covered extensively in this blog-namely the inner circle manner in which politics is actually run in France.

Anonymous said...

@DavidinParis "inner circle manner" It isn't just France though is it? Can you roll off the names of say just three of the senior unelected permanent civil servants of the EU commission in Brussels who freely admit that it is they who initiate and impose policy across the EU basically with post-facto approval by our elected representatives (the commissioners).