Friday, October 24, 2008

How ya doin'?

Periodically I take stock of how the blog is doing. As you can see from the stat counter to the right, we're over 180,000 page views, averaging about 12,000 a month of late, down from the peak of 15,000, which came after Sarkozy's "casse-toi pauvr' con" remark: there's no accounting for taste, and there's no accounting for what causes Anglophones to seek news about French politics. When they do, if they search Google under "French politics," this blog comes up number one among 16,500,000 hits, ahead even of Wikipedia. I guess that's something. There are now over 460 Feedburner subscribers.

And then I was pleased to read yesterday on one of my favorite blogs, Crooked Timber, that French Politics is "one of the treasures of the blogosphere." Thanks, Henry. Of course the pleasure was spoiled somewhat by this (predictable) comment: "I am trying very hard to resist making a comment on the suggestion that there is anything about French politics that is a 'treasure.'" Dear Antti Nannimus: if you can't find the treasure, learn to cherish la nostalgie de la boue.

In any case, I persist, and as always I welcome your suggestions of things I ought to have looked at but haven't.

7 comments:

Unknown said...

a quick technical suggestion. Like many other blogs, past entries are displayed on your blog with the time of day. This is admirably precise, though you might want the date to be displayed as well.

Unknown said...

Thanks, Bernard. Archived entries are classified by date, though, so that would be superfluous, I think.

Anonymous said...

I can only echo Crooked Timber's words - a treasure indeed.
Long may you continue to bring us this fabulous site, your succinct reporting and way with words are always a pleasure to read whether we agree on a subject or otherwise. Nice one Art.

Francofou said...

Why would anglophones not be interested in French politics?

Unknown said...

I should have said Americans rather than Anglophones. Interest runs higher in the UK, I think. Here the problems are arrogance, insularity, incuriosity, and francophobia. There is a tendency for Americans to think of the US as the center of the world. Their lack of interest is universal, not particularly directed at France. But many of my compatriots also think of France as a particularly egregious case of the fecklessness they see everywhere. When I happened to tell a doctor the other day that I worked on France, he said, "Strange, the French themselves don't work." I countered with some statistics about French productivity, GDP per capita, etc. He wasn't impressed. A nation lazy enough to work 35 hours a week and take 5 weeks of vacation a year couldn't possibly have a politics worthy of interest, he seemed to think, although at the same time he allowed that he'd like to work only 35 hours a week and take 5 weeks of vacation a year, "if only he could." You could, I said, if only you had the politics of France. He didn't get the joke.

Anonymous said...

I read your blog because it is nice to leave behind the awful clichés usually employed by the American press when reporting on France. You also give me hope that I might one day begin to understand the flow of French politics. As it stands, I have to read so, so much before I can venture an opinion. The blog helps with the political triangulation sometimes necessary in my work.

Anonymous said...

Hear, hear, Henry! This is one of the only credible sources to read analysis of French politics... so much of what gets written is authored by journalists with no sense of the complexities of French society-- even journalists who make France their "beat." So I say well done, carry on, and thank you, Art!