Monday, April 27, 2009

"While Doing Her Makeup in the Morning"

Le Figaro is in a wry mood this morning: the paper wonders whether Valérie Pécresse thinks about becoming president in 2017 "while doing her makeup in the morning." After suggesting that she is a potential rival to the dynamic duo of ambitieux, Xavier Bertrand and Jean-François Copé, it goes on to compare her "feminine" style of politics to that of Ségolène Royal. Well, I suppose that such speculation does distract from the rather unfortunate imbroglio of university reform, which is Pécresse's job when she's not contemplating herself in the mirror. On that subject, it seems that the only problem is the "deafening silence" of the Socialists on the matter of the strikes. If only the hapless opposition party would sign on to the reform effort, it is implied, the protesters would pack up and go back to class.

On a related (?) note, we have the petite phrase of Dominique de Villepin last week: asked whether it was true that he had a crush on Ségolène back when both were students at the ENA, the dashing pol said, "Oui, et pourquoi pas, elle le mérite, elle était belle et elle le reste." Most galant. Perhaps Ségo's next apology will be to M. de Villepin for having had the "merit" of attracting his roving eye.

6 comments:

Lesley said...

I believe the original word was "amourette" which suggests that not only did he have a crush on her but acted on it. So, even more galant of him?

Unknown said...

Yes, amourette. I wasn't quite sure what value to attach to the word. The dictionary says: "Attachement passager, généralement exempt de passion, et volontiers frivole, pour une personne." Exempt de passion doesn't suggest necessary action. How does the word resonate in native ears? A "crush" can be either passive or active, requited or unrequited.

Unknown said...

actually, amourette is mostly used with teenagers or still young students, it suggests a short love affair and perhaps a good translation might be a fling.

Lesley said...

Yes, "a fling" sounds absolutely right to me. Well the word does anyway, not the idea of Segolène and Villepin having one.

Unknown said...

"Fling" it is, then.

MYOS said...

He was also asked (back when L'école du pouvoir was broadcast and their characters kiss) whether the scene was pure fiction. "True gentlemen never kiss and tell" was his smiling reply.
(The gossip has been making rounds and rounds. It doesn't surprise me all that much though and I can't see why they're unearthing this old story. A friend of mine maintains it's to hurt political careers but I fail to see how a 35 year old "fling" could bear on anything nowadays. An idea about the political use of such gossip?)