Monday, March 22, 2010

Not good at resisting temptation

Dominique Strauss-Kahn, as we know, is not good at resisting temptations of many kinds. It looks as though yesterday's election results just created another one:

Now, however, the rumor mill is heating up with gossip that the Fund’s managing director, Dominique Strauss-Kahn, will leave in order to oppose Nikolas Sarkozy in the 2012 French presidential elections. Sarkozy’s popularity is hitting new lows, and Strauss-Kahn’s friends say that he has never made a secret of his political ambitions.

8 comments:

MYOS said...

Except Strauss Kahn will never win a primary - he's popular in Paris, but seriously in the provinces (SouthWest and South East where I roam) he's either considered as a capitalist lackey for being IMF president or disregarded due to his behavior toward women. He's extremely popular in Paris, I'll grant you that, and I know Frêche supports him, but I just don't see him winning primaries. He stated once that he does not like people who are less smart than he is and, let's face it, if he campaigns, he'll meet lots of those.
However I seriously doubt he'll be a candidate for primaries he's nowhere near sure of winning, when he can be IMF president. Why quit a position for another that's neither better nor certain?

Anonymous said...

The presidential throne in France has such a pull and attraction to it that normally rational persons who have no hope of ever sitting there, waste their adult lives trying to get there. Think of Fabius, Bayrou, and many many more...
Its like a drug - and Strauss-Kahn has been so addicted to wielding power that I don't think he'd turn away from the prospect of wielding more power. The quest for the presidency in France depersonalizes people wanting to obtain it and has become the ruin of many a political family.



CP

DavidinParis said...

Strauss-Kahn may have certain weaknesses, and as for the US, a president must win with a popularity contest as well. A shame considering that he is among the most qualified to govern.

Tom Holzman said...

One of the most interesting things about this discussion of DSK's chances is that what would be issue #1 in the US is completely missing in France: can a Jew be elected president? Substantive issues be damned. I guess the French are more advanced.

DavidinParis said...

I hate to burst your bubble, but I am certain that will be a topic if he were to run. I can no longer remember how many people have told me, as a contextual 'mise en scene' that Sarkozy is part Jewish and that his son converted...then went on to tell me how bad he is. Not so subtle in my mind. Not so different than the US. But then again, we elected 'that one' instead of the insane guy and the bimbo.

Boz said...

Hmm, I grant you that the possibility of the first Jewish president would garner more media coverage in the US than perhaps is the case in France, but when you talk about the number of people that would vote against someone because he's a Jew, I'd bet the proportions would be similar, if not even somewhat higher in France. What one would normally imagine would be a bigger issue in the US is if the candidate is something of a sexual predator...though if the UMP has its way, something may come up in that regard.

Anonymous said...

I don't think the French would object to electing a Jewish president, after all we have had many Jewish prime ministers, top politicians, etc..., but he shockingly said some years back that he thinks of Israel daily. Not a good idea if he wants to be elected in another country.

Domino

Tom Holzman said...

I do not recall that during the PS primaire in 2007 anyone raised the issue, even though DSK is Jewish and Fabius is of Jewish ancestry.