Saturday, April 10, 2010

From the desert 3

Alain Juppé has just struck another blow at Caesar. A wounded leader is a pitiful sight. But Juppé says one useful thing along with his various coups fourrés. This on the burqa:

Non. Soyons clairs ! Cette pratique, qui n'est pas une prescription religieuse mais une habitude importée de certaines zones géographiques, est contraire aux valeurs de la République. Mais une loi générale risque de donner le sentiment d'une stigmatisation de l'islam. Le premier ministre a choisi la bonne démarche en demandant l'avis du Conseil d'Etat sur les mesures qui s'imposent. On devrait suivre cet avis.

5 comments:

MCG said...

"Mais une loi générale risque de donner le sentiment d'une stigmatisation de l'islam."

This is an excellent example of political correctness at work. The burqua is contrary to the values of the Republic, as Juppe says. One might expect Juppe to support the values of the Republic. Instead, he is intimidated by a minority that wields its sensitivities as a weapon.

brent said...

'Political correctness,' originally coined by the American left as ironic self-criticism, only became pejorative in the hands of conservatives whose goal was to roll back the progress of stigmatized groups, especially black people and women. It seems a shame for France to adopt this term as criticism. Its origins lie in the great success of American liberalism in combatting discrimination, and French people might do better to emulate that achievement rather than mimic its retrograde detractors.

DavidinParis said...

Translation: "I think this but we will do the other instead". Typical, typical, typical. No guts, no decisions, no movement in any direction. I think the local parlance terms this as 'diplomacie'.

Anonymous said...

I feel out of the loop abit. What is the "coup" given to Sarkozy by Juppé? From the text, I would suppose Sarkozy is an adamant supporter of banning religious headgear.
(does he, Sarkozy, have such a strong opinion on the matter? Does Juppé, for that matter? or is he trying to owund a wounded lion...?)



Chris P.

eric said...

"The burqua is contrary to the values of the Republic, as Juppe says. One might expect Juppe to support the values of the Republic. Instead, he is intimidated by a minority that wields its sensitivities as a weapon."

surely the point is rather that the values of the republic are not all well-served by being enforced by legislation?