Friday, October 29, 2010

OMG!

This is unbelievable. 48 hours of garde à vue for a guy who sent Rachida Dati an e-mail asking for an "inflation." Tasteless, yes, but criminal ....? (h/t Kirk)

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

Keeping in mind that "garde à vue" has been criticized for its arbitrary nature by the European Commission.
Eolas has a great post about this:
Pourquoi Je Veux un Habeas Corpus en France
http://www.maitre-eolas.fr/post/2010/10/29/Pourquoi-je-veux-un-habeas-corpus-en-France

Bruno Roger Petit also comments;
http://www.lepost.fr/article/2010/10/29/2285657_il-reclame-une-inflation-a-rachida-dati-police-menottes-prison.html
I like his use of "sottise", you don't see that often.

Combined with the rash of thefts (intended as both intimidation and limitation of journalistic enquiry) it paints a picture of a different France than the one we used to know.

Silver lining: two perennial enemies in agreement for the sake of freedom of the press.
http://www.arretsurimages.net/vite-dit.php#9498
http://blog.rtl.fr/aphatie/20101028/trois-inquietants-cambriolages-28-10.html

The saddest thing here is that back in 2007, Sarkozy really meant hope and rejuvenation for this country.
MYOS

Anonymous said...

Interesting you can be now on "garde a vue" for 48 hours by sending an email with "inflation" and be free by saying "Casse toi pov con!"...
Maybe some Privileges otherwise French Academician will have serious freaky problems...

Anonymous said...

Anonymous, it's because Rachida Dati used another word when she meant "inflation". The letters F, l, t, i, o are in common.

Ah mais Casse toi pov con was not said to an authority representing the republic! you can insult random people as much as you want - although I wouldn't try it if you're not a president. You never know who could hear and take offense. After all, a guy was arrested and tried for saying "Sarkozy, je te vois!" upon seeing a troop of police officers.

Anonymous said...

Thanks for the precisions ...
With letters F,l,t,i,o could it be "Felicitations" ? ;-)

FrédéricLN said...

The case is the very example of the (scandalous but constant) use of "garde à vue" as a jail sentence without the person having been sentenced to anything, just by a decision of police ie the "pouvoir exécutif".

And the citizen hasn't, as far as I know, any right for a compensation of any kind, as far as the police obeyed the formal rules for "garde à vue".

To go one step beyond : it looks like the police does not trust the justice. The police would rather consider itself as a "judge Dredd" within a limited range of penalties - with the judiciary authority being required for heavier penalties. Pushing this scheme, one moght represent the judge as a "contre-pouvoir" (check and balance?) rather than a proper power; and the Constitution actually does not recognize a judiciary power ( http://fr.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pouvoir_judiciaire#En_France ), only an "authority". While the police is part of "pouvoir exécutif".

To put it otherwise: I wouldn't consider the French police to be more abusive, ruthless or anything like that, than police forces in the USA (i just don't know). But it seems that police forces in the USA consider their own authority to be based on law, while police forces in the USA consider their own authority to derive from State sovereignty.

And it lokks like Miss Dati has been considered here as a member of the inner circle of State sovereignty.

satchmo said...

Sounds like a postmodern lettre de cachet...