Thursday, December 16, 2010

Trouble ahead ...

43% of young males in "sensitive urban zones" (ZUS) were unemployed at the end of 2009. One would think that figures like this might have spurred the government to action. As the song says, "Trouble ahead, trouble behind, and you know that notion just crossed my mind."

6 comments:

Anonymous said...

2 articles that complement your post:

http://www.nytimes.com/2010/12/16/opinion/16iht-edmehr16.html?emc=tnt&tntemail0=y

http://www.cafepedagogique.net/lexpresso/Pages/2010/12/161210FKellerZEP.aspx

Anonymous said...

Actually, I don't think that Sikhar and John would have been in "les grands corps dEtat", since both were immigrants, odds are astronomical they would not even have attempted the entrance exam to these schools or made it there.
(I wish we had a % of students from immigrant origin in the schools named in that article).

Linca said...

Is it the usual confusion of using "unemployment rate" (where the denominator is the "active population") with that meaning of that proportion of the youth is without a job ?

The latter proportion is much lower, even for male youth in the suburbs. Even some of them end up studying... (or are still in high school). This 43% figure is at least a misleading exaggeration...

Unknown said...

Linca,
No, the figures are as bad as they look: "Les chiffres sont terribles : dans les zones urbaines sensibles (ZUS), 43% des jeunes hommes actifs et 37% des jeunes femmes étaient au chômage fin 2009, soit le double de la moyenne nationale." "Actif" is defined as able to work, not in school, and actively engaged in job search or employment.

Linca said...

Arthur,

That's exactly what I meant. "43% des jeunes hommes actifs" is very different from "43% des jeunes hommes". The later sentence is misleading, since, especially in the youth category, the percentage of active people is much below 100%. The former is obviously a bad figure, but doesn't necessarily say much about the long term prospects of unemployement of those youth...

I'm currently a fully employed IT engineer ; but since I graduated in a rather bad economy, I spent 50% of my "youth" active life unemployed. For example, if those youth able to go to university are lengthening their studies, it makes the employment rate worsen...

Anonymous said...

Linca, from Art's comment, I take it that 43% of young men actively looking for a job can't find one. Not from "population active" i;e. the entire segment, but only young men who aren't enrolled in school and aren't otherwise occupied, but just those who should/could be working. The youth enrolled in university don't count in these stats since they are "in school" thus excluded from the sample.


More stats explained (in English)
http://www.mediapart.fr/journal/france/131210/france-glance

Myos