Wednesday, January 17, 2018

Direct to the new blog site

To reach the new site of the French Politics blog at the Tocqueville21 site, you can use this link. If you do this, you'll go straight to my posts, and if you bookmark this link, your experience will be just like reading the old French Politics blog. But be sure to check out the contributions of my collaborators at Tocqueville21 by using the front page of the site, which offers links to the other content.

I'm going to stop publishing links here, so you should start using the new site as of today. The visual content will continue to improve, I hope, as I make the transition to the Wordpress platform and add a repertoire of images to spiff up the look of the blog. Let me know what you think by commenting on the new blog. Comments are now enabled. The first time you post a comment, your contribution will have to be approved by a moderator, but after that your comments should appear immediately. This procedure should cut down on the comment spam.

Thanks for being faithful readers all these years.

9 comments:

Samuel Bosbach said...

No RSS support at Toqueville21? Such a shame!

Francofou said...

I agree with Samuel.

Art Goldhammer said...

Trying to get this fixed now.

Vance Ricks said...

Thanks for working to fix that -- I had the same question as the first two posters. Looking forward to the new site!

C Scott Willy said...

+1 for the RSS Feed on the new blog.

Samuel Bosbach said...

Glad to hear a fix in the work! Love your writing!

Alex Price said...

My initial reaction to the design of the new blog is as follows: It's not as good as the old one. On the old site (this site), you can scroll down through the list of posts and see a good number of them, no clicking needed. It's a design that allows you to quickly see what's available and what may interest you. That's not the case on the new site. To read anything, you have to click on it, and, beyond the topic, you don't know what's behind the thumbnail icon; it could be a thousand-word post or just a few lines. Consider, for example, the newest post, on the NDDL decision. I click on it and discover (after scrolling past the photo), that it consists of just a few lines that announce the government's decision, with a one-sentence comment at the end. On the old site, I would have seen and read this post in a glance: the new site probably doubles the time necessary to access it. There is also the issue of screen space. I have a 13" screen on my laptop, so probably I see less than someone w/ a big desktop monitor, but a good design should take that into account; there are lots of people w/ little screens like mine. So what do I see? On the blog homepage, more than half of the screen is taken up by the host site menu bar, Art's photo, the blog title, and an enormous "Subscribe to our newsletter" band. As for the posts -- what I'm actually there to see -- I can only see the tops of the images that go with them; I can't see a single title. Likewise, when I click on the NDDL post, I have to scroll before I can see even a single line of the post.

The design of the new site is more modern, a bit more "professional" in appearance (it may have been created by a professional designer), but it is functionally worse.

Art Goldhammer said...

Alex,
Alas, I agree with you. I much prefer the linear design of the Blogger site, which to me is the essence of "blogginess": a chronological list of comments on the events of the day. And I like the Blogger platform better than the WordPress one, which is very fussy behind the scenes in a way that Blogger is net. But I'm working with a group here, which will add value to my one-man effort, so I'll live with the choices made and see how it goes. Already the readership is expanded and there are more comments, so that's good. And if I don't feel like blogging for a day or a week at a time, others will take up the slack. Today, for instance, you can read Jake Hamburger's fine essay on Martin Luther King.

Now, it's true that the new site has a broader focus than the old site, and some of you will be interested mianly in the commentary on contemporary French politics and not in the political theory and other more academic chitchat. For you, there's the direct link to my stuff, so you needn't be distracted if you choose not to. Admittedly, you'll have to put up with the extra clicking, as Alex notes, for which I apologize--and thank you for being such devoted readers of my thoughts. Sometimes, plus ça change, plus c'est différent.

Alex Price said...

Art, I can certainly appreciate the advantages of the new site and of your association with an organization. My disparaging comments about the design are intended as constructive criticism. If the site is ever redesigned, my hope is that feedback of this sort may spur the designers to find solutions that eliminate or diminish the flaws I attempted to describe.

But the design of a site is less important than its content. I've been following French Politics for years, and I look forward to doing so at its new home. I'm curious to see how the blog will evolve, and I wish you all the best in this new development.